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Contact Auckland’s Property Management Specialists

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Who pays the water rates?

Where a separate water meter and account is available, the tenant should pay for water usage. On our receipt of the water bill, we invoice the tenant for their exact usage.

Who pays for lawn and garden care?

Usually the tenant is responsible for lawn mowing and general garden care; however this can be negotiated at the start of the tenancy. Tree trimming, weed spraying and plant removal is usually the landlords responsibility.

Mould, whose problem?

The landlord should provide adequate ventilation for the house. Bathroom fans, secure window stays and dehumidifiers help reduce condensation and mould build up. You should use all of these methods if provided. Tenants should regularly air out the dwelling to help prevent any condensation build up.

Who maintains any listed chattels?

It is the landlord’s responsibility to ensure all chattels are properly maintained and in working order. If damage to any chattel is found to be wilful by the tenant or due to the tenant’s negligence the tenant may be responsible.

Who looks after the swimming pool or spa pool?

This can be negotiated however we recommend that landlords employ the regular services of a pool specialist then incorporate the cost into the rent. NB: The law requires all spa and swimming pools be fully fenced. We recommend to all our property owners that they check with the local council to ensure that the pool meets these regulations before tenanting. As a tenant you should also check out the pool, its surrounds and its equipment.

Who pays for insurance?

The tenant is responsible for their own ‘home contents insurance’. Landlords are responsible for insuring the property including any chattels. We strongly recommend that your own contents are fully insured.

Can my property owner sell his/her rental property any time they like?

Unless specified at the start of the tenancy, the tenancy is considered to be “Long Term” i.e. 1-2 years. Significant compensation can be awarded to the tenant if the tenancy tribunal finds that a house was sold following an unreasonably short tenancy. If a property is sold when there is a fixed term tenancy in place, the tenants are entitled to stay on until the end of that term under the same conditions but clearly with a new owner.

How often can the rent be increased?

This is regulated by law to once every 180 days (six months) during a tenancy, however if the tenancy tribunal finds that a rent increase is unreasonable or in excess of normal market rent for the property, the Tribunal can make an order for you to re-adjust the rent. Auckland Property Management monitor rental market trends and provide regular rent review recommendations to owners. Property management issues and tenancy legislation can be complex; the preceding frequently asked questions are only a selection of the most commonly asked questions by landlords and tenants. Please ask your property manager for further information

When do I receive rental payments?

On or before the fifth working day of the month following including a full statement of all income and expenses

Who pays the water rates?

Where a separate water meter and account is available, the tenant pays for water usage. The landlords’ account is charged with the total water bill we then invoice the tenant for their exact usage.

When can a tenant be evicted if they are in arrears?

When a tenant is 21 days in arrears we can apply to the tenancy tribunal for an eviction. Obtaining an eviction order can take 2-3 weeks following an application.

Who pays for lawn and garden care?

Usually the tenant is responsible for lawn mowing and general garden care, however this can be negotiated at the start of the tenancy. Tree trimming, weed spraying and plant removal is usually the landlords responsibility.

How much is property maintenance likely to cost me?

This is usually determined by the age of a property and this varies significantly between properties. The Ministry of Housing suggests a possible rule of thumb is 0.5 to 1% of the property’s value per year.

Mould, whose problem?

The landlord should provide adequate ventilation for the house. Bathroom fans, secure window stays and dehumidifiers help reduce condensation and mould build up. Tenants should regularly air out the dwelling to help prevent any condensation build up.

Who maintains any listed chattels?

It is the landlord’s responsibility to ensure all chattels are properly maintained and in working order. If damage to any chattel is found to have been wilfully inflicted by the tenant or due to the tenant’s negligence the tenant may be responsible.

Who looks after the swimming pool or spa pool?

This can be negotiated however we recommend that landlords employ the regular services of a pool specialist then incorporate the cost into the rent. You should note that New Zealand law requires all spa and swimming pools to be fully fenced. Have your local council check that your pool meets these regulations before tenanting.

Who pays for insurance?

The tenant is responsible for their own ‘home contents insurance’. Landlords are responsible for insuring the property including any chattels owned by the owner. We strongly recommend that your property is fully insured.

Can I sell my property any time I like?

Unless specified at the start of the tenancy, the tenancy is considered to be “Long Term” i.e. 1-2 years. Significant compensation can be awarded to the tenant if the tenancy tribunal finds that a house was sold following an unreasonably short tenancy. If a property is sold when there is a fixed term tenancy in place, the tenants are entitled to stay on until the end of that term under the same conditions.

How much vacant time per year should I expect?

We recommend that you budget for 2 weeks per annum.

How often can we increase the rent?

This is regulated by law to once every 180 days (six months) during a tenancy, however if the tenancy tribunal finds that a rent increase is unreasonable or in excess of normal market rent for the property, it can make an order for you to re-adjust the rent.

I hear so many horror stories about bad tenants, what happens if my tenant doesn’t pay the rent?

To put it simply, we have a no payment, no tolerance’ policy. Tenants are contacted repeatedly beginning on day 1 of missing a rent payment to secure payment of a missed payment.
Auckland Property Management has a thorough screening process of new tenants. This process has been refined to ensure only the best tenants receive our approval, and therefore very few problems arise.  We pride ourselves on excellent and open communication with tenants. This ensures that we can often pre-empt potential red flats before they arise and find a solution before non-payment of rent becomes a problem.

We have a very comprehensive follow up and reminder system to reduce arrears as much as possible including phone, SMS, email and letter based reminders as outlined in our written arrears policy.

I’ve found another real estate agent with lower fees, why should I stick with Auckland Property Management?

The property management field has become very competitive in recent years. In their enthusiasm to win your business, many companies are prepared to drop their fees below industry standards. Your investment property could be one of the largest investments and it needs to be confidently managed. Wouldn’t you rather have a professional company who has confidence that their skill set will add value to your portfolio and reduce the risk of your investment? Our investors do, and they also refer many of their friends to Auckland Property Management. These are investors who have struggled with cheaper versions of service that have ultimately cost them money, and are now some of our strongest advocates. They have peace of mind and complete management of their property.

Our core focus is ensuring our clients, you, are 100% happy and earning maximum returns while nurturing the tenant to ensure long term relationships that in turn add value to your property.

This is why over 30 landlords a month are transferring to APM. We believe our systems are the best in NZ, and our clients, we are happy to report, seem to agree with us.

Can we access our account information online?

Yes, you can access your account ledger via our Owners Portal, a portal dedicated to your property and Body Corporate information.

How do I access the Owners Portal?

You can access the Owners Portal by selecting from the main menu Body Corporate – Client Login. Click on the Body Corporate login icon and enter your login details. Make sure you select the appropriate ‘User Role’ e.g. Use Owner if you are a Body Corporate Owner, and change to Executive Member if you are a member of a Body Corporate Committee.
If you have forgotten your Username or Password, reset them here.

Can we access financial reports?

Yes, you can access financial information relevant to your Body Corporate or property in the Owners Portal.

Owners can:

  • View important financial reports E.g. Balance sheets, income and expenditure statements and the insurance summary.

Executive Members can:

  • View additional financial reports E.g. Aged arrears list, detailed expenses and investment balances.

Can we access committee meeting minutes and copies of the Body Corporate rules?

You will need to contact your Body Corporate Manager about accessing the dedicated web page for your Body Corporate. Each Body Corporate has specific webpages with information such as meeting minutes, Body Corporate rules, long term maintenance plans, and more!

How do I pay my levy online?

You can pay your levies on our website by selecting from the main menu Body Corporate – Pay Levies. You will be asked to enter your Body Corporate details and then it will take you to a secure payment portal. Please note that a 2.75% credit card transaction surcharge will be applied automatically and will be added to the total levy payment.

Who do I contact if I have a Body Corporate/Crosslease that needs to be managed?

Contact Steven Garland, Body Corporate General Manager on [email protected] if you are looking for reduced risk Body Corporate Management.

What does a Commercial Property Manager do?

A Commercial Property Manager can be employed by the owner(s) of the property to supervise the operation of the premises. This will include handling all the day to day issues that may arise with tenants, as well as a number of specific services such as;

  • Lease Management: This includes negotiating terms of the lease and discussing lease requirements with tenants before they expire- we aim for 100% occupancy.
  • Building WOF: Ensuring that the Building Warrant of Fitness is renewed and kept up-to-date.
  • Maintenance: Ensuring that maintenance contracts are expertly negotiated and in place for the Commercial premises.
  • Accounting: Not only paying accounts on behalf of the building, but providing;

(a) Monthly financial reports of monies received and expenses

(b) Year-end summaries of all the properties income and expenditure

Although this list is not extensive, these are some of the services that you can expect from the Commercial Property Management team at Auckland Property Management.

For a full list of our Commercial Property Management services click here

What does OPEX mean?

OPEX is an abbreviation for Operating Expenses. Operating Expenses include all of the expenses for the commercial building that are usually split proportionately between the tenants according to their lease terms. These expenses may include council rates, insurance, lift maintenance, common area cleaning, grounds maintenance as well as fire system and alarm system monitoring.

What is a Building Warrant of Fitness?

The Building Warrant of Fitness (BWOF) is legally required under the Building Act and is monitored by the local government. The BWOF has been implemented to ensure that the essential mechanical facilities within a building are maintained to a specific standard. Not all commercial property requires a BWOF. Commercial properties often need a BWOF if there are facilities such as a lift, an escalator, automatic doors, or a sprinkler system. If your property requires a BWoF then you must display this in a public area of the premises.

What is a Deed of Lease?

The Deed of Lease is a document that determines & governs the relationship between the owner of the property and the tenant of the property. The Lease will detail terms and conditions for the tenant to abide by, such as the rent payable, the length of the lease, and the proportion of OPEX that is to be paid by the tenant. The Deed of Lease will also determine when rent reviews must take place and what happens at the end of the lease period.

What is Commercial property?

A commercial property is a complex from which one or more businesses operate from. Commercial property includes a variety of property such as retail shops, shopping malls, car park buildings, office buildings, motels, industrial sites, and much more.

Or, to speak with one of the team about your property management, here are our physical contact details:

Prospective tenants: Register your interest only through the property listing page to be advised of updates, viewing times, price changes and/or cancellations.  Please note, we do not keep tenant waiting lists for properties.


Auckland Property Management Ltd

145 Manukau Road, Epsom, 1023, Auckland
Ph: (09) 638 2500 Fax: (09) 639 0873
Email: [email protected]
Postal: PO Box 28510, Remuera,1541, Auckland
Hours: Open from 8.30am – 5.00pm, Monday – Friday


Waiheke Island Contact Details

Auckland Property Management Ltd & Waiheke Escapes
1 Puriri Road Oneroa, Waiheke Island 1081
Ph: (09) 638 2570 Fax: (09) 639 0873
Email: [email protected] or [email protected]
Postal: PO Box 28510, Remuera, 1541, Auckland

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